Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) | a Comprehensive Hazard Communication Document - Aviation Professional

Monday, 19 July 2021

Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) | a Comprehensive Hazard Communication Document

 

safety data sheet sds

 

MSDS is an acronym for Materials Safety Data Sheet, a safety data sheet (SDS), or product safety data sheet (PSDS). It is a safety document that contains safety data about the physical properties of a particular hazardous substance. MSDS material safety data sheet used for effectively communicating types of hazards for a variety of chemicals.  Most chemicals go under one or more dangerous goods classes, such as dg class 2 compressed gases, dg class3 flammable and combustible liquids, etc.

Have you seen MSDS before?

The following is a clear meaning of a MSDS.

 

What is a material safety data sheet (MSDS)?

A purpose of a Materials Safety Data Sheet MSDS is to contain information about the physical properties of the chemicals (hazardous substances), their health effects, and safety measures on handling, storing, transporting, and disposal of the chemicals, as well as first aid and emergency responses.

 

By whom is MSDS provided?

Chemical manufacturers or suppliers prepare MSDSs to meet the legal requirements of the countries in which they market products and distribute materials, with the guidance of international standards such as those published by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the International Standards Organization (ISO).  


These requirements and standards are in convergence with an internationally harmonized system for SDS format and content—the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). The information contained in the SDS is the same as the MSDS, except the SDSs are required to be presented in a consistent user-friendly, 16-section format.


SDS must be prepared for every chemical substance or product that has been classified as hazardous under the GHS. The chemical manufacturers or suppliers of MSDS should review the information periodically (not longer than three years from the last date of issue of the SDS, revise and update within six months after the review).

 

What is the importance of MSDS?

MSDS is a universal hazard communication tool which intended to supplement the alert information provided on labels. Furthermore, it helps in ensuring the safe use of hazardous chemicals.

Materials Safety Data Sheet enabling users to:

1.       Identify the hazards of the chemical

2.       Assess the risk involved in handling the chemical

3.       Take the precautionary measures to eliminate or minimize the risk

How do you Get MSDS Sheets?

To obtain MSDS, you can get them from the manufacturer or suppliers.

Usually, manufacturers or suppliers sending MSDS with the chemical order (paper copy or e-mail attachment). Otherwise, you can visit their website and download it or request a copy.

 

What must SDS contain?

Material safety data sheet must provide at least nine sections of content and approximately sixty items of information distributed among those categories. In this article, I am going to explain SDS contents because SDS covers more information than MSDS.

Some SDS  subheadings relate to information that is national or regional, for example, "EC number" and "occupational exposure limits". manufacturer or supplier should include information under such SDS subheadings that is appropriate and relevant to the countries or regions for which the SDS is intended and into which the product is being supplied.

Before starting to explaining the SDS content, it is important to know the meaning of GHC.

Globally Harmonized System for Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS)

In 2003, the United Nations (UN) adopted the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). GHS prescribes criteria for the classification of health, physical and environmental hazards, and specifies what information should be included on labels and SDSs of hazardous chemicals.

 

Safety data sheet (SDS) must contain sixteen sections of content in the following sequence:


Section 1

Identification of the substance or mixture and the supplier

The Elements

(a) GHS product identifier;

(b) Other means of identification;

(c) Recommended use of the chemical and restrictions on use;

(d) Supplier's details (including name, address, phone number etc.);

(e) Emergency phone number

Example

I will give you an example of the element (a)

 

Product identifier

Product Name     Clorox® Regular-Bleach1

 

Section 2

Hazards identification

The Elements

(a) GHS classification of the substance/mixture and any national or regional information;

(b) GHS label elements, including precautionary statements. (Hazard symbols may be provided as a graphical reproduction of the symbols in black and white or the name of the symbol e.g. "flame", "skull and crossbones");

(c) Other hazards which do not result in classification (e.g. "dust explosion hazard") or are not covered by the GHS.

Example

I will give you an example of the element (b)

See the image below

 

 

sds example

Section 3

Composition/ information on ingredients

The Elements

Substance

(a)          Chemical identity;

(b)          Common name, synonyms, etc.;

(c)           CAS number and other unique identifiers;

(d)          Impurities and stabilizing additives which are themselves classified and which contribute to the classification of the substance.

Mixture

The chemical identity and concentration or concentration ranges of all ingredients which are hazardous within the meaning of the GHS and are present above their cut-off levels.

 

NOTE: For information on ingredients, the competent authority rules for CBI take priority over the rules for product identification.

Note : CBI means "confidential business information".

Example

I will give you an example of Substance elements ( a,b,c,d)

 

See the image below

 

 

msds example

Section 4

First-aid measures

The Elements

(a) Description of necessary measures, subdivided according to the different routes of exposure, i.e. inhalation, skin and eye contact and ingestion;

(b) Most important symptoms/effects, acute and delayed.

(c) Indication of immediate medical attention and special treatment needed, if necessary.

Example

I will give you an example of elements (b)

 

Most Important Symptoms and Effects  

Burning of eyes and skin.

 

 

Section 5

Fire-fighting measures

The Elements

(a) Suitable (and unsuitable) extinguishing media.

(b) Specific hazards arising from the chemical (e.g. nature of any hazardous combustion products).

(c) Special protective equipment and precautions for fire-fighters.

Example

I will give you an example of elements (c)

Protective equipment and precautions for firefighters

As in any fire, wear self-contained breathing apparatus pressure-demand, MSHA/NIOSH (approved or equivalent) and full protective

gear.

 

Note :

MSHA means the "Mine Safety and Health Administration ".

NIOSH means the " National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health".

 

Section 6

Accidental release measures

The Elements

(a) Personal precautions, protective equipment and emergency procedures.

(b) Environmental precautions.

(c) Methods and materials for containment and cleaning up.

Example

I will give you an example of elements (a)

Personal Precautions, protective equipment and emergency procedures.

Avoid contact with eyes, skin, and clothing. Ensure adequate ventilation. Use personal protective equipment as required. For spills of multiple products, responders should evaluate the MSDSs of the products for incompatibility with sodium hypochlorite. Breathing protection should be worn in enclosed and/or poorly-ventilated areas until hazard assessment is complete.

 

 

Section 7

Handling and storage

The Elements

(a) Precautions for safe handling.

(b)Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities.

Example

I will give you an example of elements (b)

Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities

Storage

Store away from children. Reclose cap tightly after each use. Store this product upright in a cool, dry area, away from direct sunlight and heat to avoid deterioration. Do not contaminate food or feed by storage of this product.

Incompatible Products

Toilet bowl cleaners, rust removers, acids, and products containing ammonia.

 

 

Section 8

Exposure controls/personal protection

The Elements

(a) Control parameters e.g. occupational exposure limit values or  biological limit values.

(b) Appropriate engineering controls.

(c) Individual protection measures, such as personal protective equipment.

Example

I will give you an example of elements (b)

Individual protection measures, such as personal protective equipment

Eye/Face Protection

If splashes are likely to occur: Wear safety glasses with side shields (or goggles) or face shield.

Skin and Body Protection

Wear rubber or neoprene gloves and protective clothing such as long-sleeved shirt.

Respiratory Protection

·         If irritation is experienced, NIOSH/MSHA approved respiratory protection should be worn.

·         Positive-pressure supplied air respirators may be required for high airborne contaminant concentrations.

·         Respiratory protection must be provided in accordance with current local regulations.

Hygiene Measures

·         Handle in accordance with good industrial hygiene and safety practice. Wash hands after direct contact.

·         Do not wear product-contaminated clothing for prolonged periods. Remove and wash contaminated clothing before re-use.

·         Do not eat, drink, or smoke when using this product.

 

Section 9

Physical and chemical properties

The Elements

(a) Appearance (physical state, colour etc);

(b) Odour;

(c) Odour threshold;

(d) pH;

(e) Melting point/freezing point;

(f) Initial boiling point and boiling range;

(g) Flash point;

.

.

(r) Viscosity.

Example

I will give you an example of elements (g)

Flash Point

Not flammable

 

Section 10

Stability and reactivity

The Elements

(a) Reactivity

(b) Chemical stability;

(c) Possibility of hazardous reactions;

(d) Conditions to avoid (e.g. static discharge, shock or vibration);

(e) Incompatible materials;

(f) Hazardous decomposition products.

Example

I will give you an example of elements (d)

Conditions to avoid

None known based on information supplied.

 

Section 11

Toxicological information

The Elements

Concise but complete and comprehensible description of the various toxicological (health) effects and the available data used to identify those effects, including:

(a) Information on the likely routes of exposure (inhalation, ingestion, skin and eye contact);

(b) Symptoms related to the physical, chemical and toxicological characteristics;

(c) Delayed and immediate effects and also chronic effects from short- and long-term exposure;

(d) Numerical measures of toxicity (such as acute toxicity estimates).

Example

I will give you an example of elements (a)

Information on likely routes of exposure

Product Information

Inhalation

Exposure to vapor or mist may irritate respiratory tract and cause coughing. Inhalation of high concentrations may cause pulmonary edema.

Eye Contact

Corrosive. May cause severe damage to eyes.

Skin Contact

May cause severe irritation to skin. Prolonged contact may cause burns to skin.

Ingestion

Ingestion may cause burns to gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

 

Section 12

Ecological information

The Elements

(a) Ecotoxicity (aquatic and terrestrial, where available);

(b) Persistence and degradability;

(c) Bio accumulative potential;

(d) Mobility in soil;

(e) Other adverse effects.

Example

I will give you an example of elements (a)

Ecotoxicity

·         Very toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects.

·         This product is toxic to fish, aquatic invertebrates, oysters, and shrimp.

·         Do not allow product to enter storm drains, lakes, or streams.

 

 

Section 13

Disposal considerations

The Elements

Description of waste residues and information on their safe handling and methods of disposal, including the disposal of any contaminated packaging.

Example

I will give you an example of this element

Disposal methods

Dispose of in accordance with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations. Do not contaminate food or feed by disposal of this

product.

 

 

Section 14

Transport information

The Elements

(a) UN number;

(b) UN proper shipping name;

(c) Transport hazard class(es);

(d) Packing group, if applicable;

(e) Environmental hazards (e.g.: Marine pollutant (Yes/No));

(f) Transport in bulk (according to 11 of MARPOL 73/78 and the IBC Code);

(g) Special precautions which a user needs to be aware of, or needs to comply with, in connection with transport or conveyance either within or outside their premises.

Example

I will give you an example of this element

Transport information

DOT Not restricted.

TDG Not restricted for road or rail.

ICAO Not restricted, as per Special Provision A197, Environmentally Hazardous Substance exception.

 

IATA Not restricted, as per Special Provision A197, Environmentally Hazardous Substance exception.

IMDG/IMO Not restricted, as per IMDG Code 2.10.2.7, Marine Pollutant exception.

Note :

Dot means the " Department of Transport".

TDG means  the " Transportation of Dangerous Goods"

ICAO means the " The International Civil Aviation Organization"

IATA means the " The International Air Transport Association"

IMDG means the "The International Maritime Dangerous Goods "
IMO means the "International Maritime Organization".

 

Section 15

Regulatory information

The Elements

Safety, health and environmental regulations specific for the product in question.

Example

I will give you an example of this element

International Regulations

Canada

WHMIS Hazard Class

E - Corrosive material

 

Note : (WHMIS) means "The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System "

 

Section 16

Other information including information on preparation and revision of the SDS

The Elements

Safety, health and environmental regulations specific for the product in question.

Example

I will give you an example of this element

Revision Date

June 12, 2015

 

Note : This SDS is not valid anymore but use as example

 

 See complete MSDS example click here

Summary

Chemical manufacturers and suppliers are required to obtain or develop an MSDS for each hazardous chemical they produce or import. Distributors are responsible for ensuring that their customers are provided a copy of these MSDSs.

The role of MSDSs is to provide detailed information on each hazardous chemical, including its potential hazardous effects, its physical and chemical characteristics, and recommendations for appropriate protective measures.

The SDS includes information such as the properties of each chemical; the physical, health, and environmental health hazards; protective measures; and safety precautions for handling, storing and transporting the chemical. The information contained in the SDS is in English. (although it may be in other languages as well).

The information contained in the SDS is the same as the MSDS, except the SDSs are required to be presented in a consistent user-friendly, 16-section format.

 

Further reading:

-          Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS), United Nation

 

 


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