IATA Dangerous Goods Table – 2.3.A

IATA Dangerous Goods Table – 2.3.A

DG Carried by Airline Passengers


  

For a safe air travel journey, you should pack your baggage yourself and be aware that some of the items you pack in your baggage may be considered dangerous goods (also known as hazardous materials). Most dangerous goods are forbidden in carry-on and checked baggage, but they're a few exceptions for some personnel items such as a medicinal article, toiletry articles, personal electronic devices with batteries, and assistive devices, etc. 

 

In this article, you will be aware of the common dangerous goods items that are allowed in carry-on and/or checked baggage, and which are not (IATA prohibited items).

I would advise my readers when they are in doubt about dangerous goods items while packing their baggage, just they can leave them out.

 

Why? because anything goes wrong by dangerous goods items whilst being carried onboard an aircraft, it can pose a serious threat to the safety of both the aircraft and the airline passengers.

 

 

Besides dangerous goods regulations, there is a security regulation- ICAO annex 17 - that lists prohibited items that pose a security threat (provisions for high consequence dangerous goods). 

 

At all times, you should refer to your airlines to get full guidelines regarding what kind of dangerous goods items are allowed or you can check airlines' websites for this information.

 

Well, dangerous goods regulations list dangerous goods items we can’t live without and allow us to carry them in our carry-on and/or checked baggage (flight luggage), but only if we follow the IATA dangerous goods (Table 2.3.A). 

 

Note1: IATA DGR manual contains all- and more restrictive than- the ICAO annex 18 and ICAO technical instructions for the safe transport of dangerous goods by air.

 

Note2: Airline passengers & crew are forbidden from travelling with certain types of dangerous goods such as corrosive substances.

 

IATA Definition of Dangerous Goods

Dangerous goods – also known as hazardous material- are articles or substances which are capable of posing a risk to health, safety, property, or the environment and which are shown in the list of dangerous goods in the IATA dangerous goods regulations or which are classified according to it.


 

Hidden Dangerous Goods | In airline passengers' & crew’s baggage 

Hidden dangerous goods is a term used in international hazmat shipping, I am using it here to emphasize the importance of declaring carriage of dangerous goods by airline passengers and crew.

 

Most common dangerous goods in the airline’s passenger baggage are fireworks, flammable household liquids, corrosive ovens, or drain cleaners, flammable gas or liquid lighter refills, camping stove cylinders, matches, ammunition, bleach, aerosols (those not permitted under IATA dangerous goods regulations (Table 2.3.A, provisions for dangerous goods carried by airline passenger or crew), etc.

 

Note: The provisions of Table 2.3. A - IATA dangerous goods regulations - may be limited by State or operator variations. You should check with their airline for the current provisions.


 

9 Classes of Dangerous Goods

If not, these are all dangerous goods classes:

Class 1 Dangerous Goods:

Explosives 

 

Hazmat Class 1 Example:

Fireworks 

 

Note: it is forbidden to be carried with air airline passengers and crew. Only UN 0012 , UN 1014, only in division 1.4S.

 

Class 2 Dangerous Goods:

Gases

 

Hazmat Class 2 Example:

 Aerosols, Flammable gas

 

Note: it is forbidden to be carried with air airline passengers & crew. Exceptions for division 2.2 non-flammable non-toxic gas.

 

Class 3 Dangerous Goods:

Flammable Liquids

 

Hazmat Class 3 Example:

Flammable liquids for home use.

 

Note: it is forbidden to be carried with air airline passengers & crew. Exceptions for Specimens, non-infectious packed with small quantities of flammable liquid.

 

Class 4 Dangerous Goods:

Flammable solids; substances liable to spontaneous combustion; substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases.

 

Hazmat Class 4 Example:

 Matches 

 

Class 5 Dangerous Goods:

Oxidizing substances and organic peroxides.

 

Hazmat Class 5 Example:

Bleach

 

Class 6 Dangerous Goods:

Toxic and Infectious substances.

 

Hazmat Class 6 Example:  

Pesticides & blood (not for transfer without medical certificate)

 

Note: it is forbidden to be carried with air airline passengers & crew at all times

 

Class 7 Dangerous Goods:

 Radioactive material

 

Hazmat Class 7 Example:

 Radioactive Medicinal Articles 

 

Class 8 Dangerous Goods:

 Corrosive materials

 

Hazmat Class 8 Example:

 Mercury 

 

Note: it is forbidden to be carried with air airline passengers & crew at all times

 

Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods

Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods substances and articles, including environmentally hazardous substances.

 

Hazmat Class 9 example:

  1. DG class 9, Dry Ice 
  2. Electric Wheelchair

 

Where are dangerous goods items are carried by passengers?

Dangerous goods, including excepted packages of radioactive material, must not be carried by airlines passengers or crew:

  1. as or in checked baggage
  2. as or in carry-on baggage; or
  3. on one’s person ( in person’s pockets or inside person's body such as radioisotopic cardiac pacemakers)

Except as listed by IATA dangerous goods table – 2.3.A IATA DGR 63rd edition.

 

Provision of Information to Passengers

aircraft operator (airline) must inform airline passengers about dangerous goods that airline passengers are forbidden to carry aboard aircraft.

This subject needs further explanation but not in this article, you can read aircraft operator responsibilities regarding hazmat shipping.  

 

Understanding IATA DGR Manual TABLE 2.3.A

This table is published in IATA DGR 63rd edition, it is called provisions for dangerous goods carried by passengers or crew

 

IATA Table - 2.3.A


IATA Dangerous Goods Table - 2.3.A | Main 4 Columns

This IATA Dangerous Goods Table - 2.3.A Provisions for Dangerous Goods Carried by Passengers or Crew Include 4 Columns AS The Following:



Column 1   The pilot-in-command must be informed of the location

This column tells us that the captain who is the commander of the flight must be notified about the location which the dangerous goods will be carried in.

This location may be passenger seat number for carry-on baggage or aircraft compartment number if the dangerous goods item is accepted as checked baggage. The information is transmitted by aircraft loadmaster via note in the load sheet document or by separate NOTOC form.

Example: Alcoholic beverages (over 24% not more 70% alcohol by volume), no need to inform the captain about its location. This because it is not flammable due to the low alcohol by volume.


Column 2     Permitted in or as carry-on baggage

This column tells us that the dangerous goods item is permitted in or as hand baggage.

Example: Alcoholic beverages (over 24% not more 70%), is permitted in or as hand baggage in receptacles not exceeding 5 L, with a total net quantity per person of 5 L.


Column 3     Permitted in or as checked baggage

Example: Alcoholic beverages (over 24% not more 70%), is permitted in or as checked baggage (only in receptacles not exceeding 5 L, with a total net quantity per person of 5 L).

There are many dangerous goods items that is forbidden to be carried in or as checked baggage such a Lithium battery, spare/loose. 

This because it may cause fire as a result of sparks or by any means. Lithium batteries, spare/loose is allow in carry-on baggage because cabin crew will manage the fire - in-flight fire -  if it happens in the aircraft cabin.

 

 Column 4   The approval of the operator is required

Aircraft operators (commercial airlines) or its ground handling agent must have a approved documented process – in operations manual - that list the dangerous goods items that can be accepted. Also, explaining how the approval is granted, and by whom.

Dangerous goods accepted by the aircraft operator or its ground handling agent can be either in carry-on baggage or in checked baggage. Also, the approval is needed for both depending on the dangerous goods item itself.


IATA Dangerous Goods Table - 2.3.A | Rows

All dangerous goods items which are allowed/ forbidden are listed aphetically. You will see in the table the proper shipping name is marked with bolded letters. 

The table ends with Thermometer or barometer, mercury filled carried by a representative of a government weather bureau or similar official agency.

Note: For air cargo professionals, locate the technical name (Thermometer or barometer), you will locate it under UN2727, and reference to (UN 3506).


Forbidden Dangerous Goods

1- Attaché Cases, Cash Boxes/Bags

Example:

Cash bags incorporating dangerous goods such as lithium batteries and/or pyrotechnic materials.

2- Disabling Devices

Example:

Disabling devices such as mace, pepper spray, etc. this item IATA has more restrictive rules than ICAO, FAA do.

3- Liquid Oxygen Devices

Example:

Personal medical oxygen devices that utilize liquid oxygen.

 

4- Electro Shock Weapons

Example:

Tasers - electro shock weapons containing dangerous goods such as explosives, compressed gases, lithium batteries, etc.


5- lithium battery-powered lighters

Example:

Laser plasma lighters- powered by lithium ion or lithium metal battery.

 

 

Summary 

Dangerous goods must not be carried in or as checked or carry-on baggage, except as otherwise provided in the IATA DGR manual. 

 

What you have learnt from this article

I am sure that you are able to read the IATA dangerous goods table – 2.3.A correctly.

 

The provisions of Table 2.3. A - IATA dangerous goods regulations - may be limited by State or operator variations. You should check with their airline for the current provisions. You can read the IATA dangerous goods regulations Table 2.3.A PDF click on the link. I recommend that you enroll IATA DGR training.

 

Thank you for all of you, and I welcome the new followers. Aviation Professional website is a home for aviation articles.

Maged Saeed AL-Hadabi

I’m Instructor / Maged Saeed Al-Hadabi. ​ Air Cargo / IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations / Safety Management System Senior Instructor, Auditor [ Yemen Airways] . Approved IATA DGR/ SMS Instructor by Yemen Civil Aviation Authority. We hope you find Aviation Professional website not only informative, but interesting and helpful as well. Leave your comment , thank you.

Previous Post Next Post

Contact Form