How to Develop and Maintain a Mature Safety Culture - Aviation Professional

Monday, 30 November 2020

How to Develop and Maintain a Mature Safety Culture

 

Safety Culture

In safety, everyone can have a clear idea of what it means to be safe and act upon it in workplaces and in normal life activities. What do we, as individuals, and as an organization - actually mean by safety? This really has to be a lot more than just the emotional call to be safe. If we have that articulated idea in our heads then we can create the clear vision -"the vision is safety first”-, we know what we want and we can communicate it much more easily. Integrity and trust become simpler to develop and maintain a safe work environment.

In airlines*, safety culture has a significant influence on what people do about safety issues, it contributes to strong safety performance. Because of its importance, I decided to write about it [safety culture] and how safety leadership is critical in the term of developing and maintaining a mature safety culture.

*as well as other companies

 

What Is a Safety Culture?

What people understand by safety, how they understand messages about safety and how they understand the risks they face, is not absolute. It's determined by the culture, the common set of values, beliefs, attitudes and working practices that determine people's behaviors. This collection is what we call “the safety culture”.

Safety culture is ‘the way we do things around here’, if we do our work inline with safety policy – it is a good safety culture.

Safety Culture and Safety Management System (SMS)

 

 ICAO Annex 19 requirements help safety leaders at airlines to maintain a mature safety culture by apply current safety thinking effectively to achieve safer airline's operations.

 

SMS is a proactive and integrated approach to managing safety including the necessary organizational structures, accountabilities, policies, and procedures. It is more than a manual and a set of procedures and requires safety management to be integrated into the day-to-day operational activities of the airline. It requires the development of an organizational culture that reflects the safety policy and objectives.


Safety Culture and Leadership

Numerous academic studies of safety culture have found culture hard to capture but all agree on one dimension - the importance of leadership and safety leadership in particular.

Safety leadership is a combination of commitment and action that influences others to do the same. Safety Leaders through the airline make a major contribution to determining the safety culture. The decisions, actions, and behaviors of these leaders set benchmarks for safety through the systems and processes they put in place and promote and support.

 

Effective safety leadership makes a major contribution to the development of a mature safety culture. Safety leaders should build the following foundations for the safety culture through:

 

1)     Management Commitment And Leadership


Demonstrating commitment, modeling safety behaviors and leading others in improving safety. 


2)     Reporting And Learning Culture


Encouraging the flow of information – through a culture of reporting – which supports learning in the airline.


3)     Worker Involvement


Supporting and developing worker capability and their involvement in safety.


4)     Just And Fair Culture


Creating a fair and just culture so workers feel they will be treated fairly and consistently

 

What is the meaning of " Just Culture"?

It is “An atmosphere of trust in which people are encouraged for providing essential safety-related information, but in which they are clear about where the line must be drawn between acceptable and unacceptable behavior”.

 

5)     Risk Awareness


Contributing to increasing risk awareness across the airline’s operations.


6)     Feedback Strategies.


Staff must receive feedback about any safety report made by them.

 

Conclusion


Safety culture is ‘the way we do things around here’ and reflects the values, beliefs, and attitudes of individuals and management within the airline . A mature safety culture contributes to strong safety performance.


SMS helps airlines in developing and maintaining a mature safety culture that reflects the safety policy and objectives.


Numerous academic studies of safety culture have found culture hard to capture but all agree on one dimension - the importance of leadership and safety leadership in particular.


Safety Leaders through the airline make a major contribution to determining the safety culture. The decisions, actions, and behaviors of these leaders set benchmarks for safety through the systems and processes they put in place and promote and support.


Everyone can be a safety leader because anyone can show their colleagues how they work safely by following airline's safety policy. We should promote a positive safety culture by reporting safety risks to SMS manager.


Aviation professional website believe on "the vision of safety first". Do you agree with our vision?

 

 

 

 

 


5 comments:

  1. Hi can you tell me exactly which academic papers this article is referring too? I am looking for research material on this very topic and would appreciate any help!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Mr.Dave Sheahan, I will check Article References and back to you.

      Delete
    2. Well, I used "Safety Culture and Leadership" academic paper by Professor Patrick Hudson - Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
      In addition to, I used ICAO Annex 19 and Safety leadership and culture, by NSW Transport Roads and Maritime Services.

      I will be at help any time and I will be happy if I got updated by any researches regarding aviation safety.

      Delete
  2. and focusing on, a solid safety culture. These reach from expanded staff confidence and expanded profitability, to diminished injury-related expenses, cutthroat protection charges and improved turnover benefits and notoriety. mélybölcsős szállítás Europa-Road Kft.

    ReplyDelete